Having “The Talk” With Your Workplace When You Need Treatment

Having “The Talk” With Your Workplace When You Need Treatment

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– April 17, 2017

Mental health and mental illness come with shame and stigma. Shame and stigma are damaging associations which characterize mental illnesses as weaknesses, moral choices, and bad things people do to themselves. There is nothing wrong with having a mental illness and wanting to work on your mental health. Thankfully, many laws have been put into place to protect you and your rights as a worker when you are in need of mental health treatment. Making the decision to leave work and seek help for a mental health condition is a huge decision. Having the support of your boss and company to take the time you need to heal is essential to moving forward in recovery. Unfortunately, many people do not receive that support and continue to hide their mental illness.

Create A Why

If your workplace has an open policy for taking time off, then it shouldn’t be a problem as to where, when, or why you’re leaving. If you have to do some more explaining, think about the “why” for disclosing information regarding your mental health. Clearly, one “why”, is that you want to have a place to come back to work after treatment. It’s possible that you have been struggling at work and your mental health condition is impacting your productivity, accountability, and efficiency. Disclosing your mental illness could help your employer understand that you’ve been struggling and are committed to getting better.

Inform Your Employer

Disclosing your mental illness is only one part of the equation. You can use the opportunity to inform and educate your employer about your mental illness, what it is like to live with it, and what it will take to treat it, as well as heal from it. You can express to them your intentions for getting better and coming back a better version of yourself.

Feel Proud

When you are struggling so greatly with your mental illness and have to ask for time to go to treatment, you might not feel your best. Asking for help isn’t a sign of weakness, it’s a sign of courage. Walk in and walk out with your head held high. The best is yet to come.

Taking time to go to treatment is scary. Get Real Recovery wants to ensure you have the best experience possible. Our goal is to help you succeed in sobriety and recovery from addiction, alcoholism and/or a co-occurring mental health disorder. For more information on our treatment programs, call 866-983-3651 today.

Shruti C
Shruti C, on in Addiction

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