Common Excuses for Putting Off Rehab

Common Excuses for Putting Off Rehab

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Addiction recovery professionals typically say that freedom from addiction can be achieved through clinical intervention—but it’s vital to pursue recovery sooner rather than later. Putting it off can make things that much worse, and recovery that much more difficult.

Despite this warning, there are many who know they need help, but delay seeking it. There are a number of possible reasons for this, but ultimately none of them really hold water.

Why Do People Put Off Recovery?

They Don’t Think They Have Time

This is sort of like saying you’re not going to have bypass surgery because you just don’t have time for it—even though you know a heart attack could kill you. Addiction is life-threatening, and recovery is imperative. Plus, there are treatment options—including day treatments—that are more flexible than you might think.

They Think It’s Too Expensive

Recovery is an investment in life-long freedom and good health—plus, it is often covered by insurance, and there can be other options for financial assistance, as well.

They Have Too Many Family Obligations

Remember that addiction impacts not just you, but your loved ones, as well—and they want you to get healthy as soon as possible. Seeking recovery is the best thing you can do for them.

They Can’t Afford Time Off from Work

Again, there are flexible options, including executive rehab programs and outpatient services. It’s also worth inquiring about help or support services offered by your company’s HR team. More and more companies are accommodating to the needs of addiction recovery.

They’re Scared

Recovery can seem like a daunting, unknown experience—but remember: It’s all about seeking the best medical care and finding freedom from addiction. And most importantly, it works.

Seek recovery today. Stop making excuses, and instead begin the next chapter of your life—one free of addiction and its ravages.

GC
GC, on in Alcholism, Mental Health, Recovery

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