Alcoholism is a Public Health Crisis

Alcoholism is a Public Health Crisis

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Troubling new data shows that alcoholism has reached epidemic proportions in America, with one in eight American adults now struggling with alcohol addiction. This marks a noteworthy increase, largely as more and more women and elderly people find themselves fighting against alcoholism.

More Than 12 Million Struggle with Alcoholism

More than 12 million Americans have been diagnosed with alcoholism—and if that number seems like it should be grabbing headlines, well, many addiction recovery specialists agree. As the opioid crisis continues to grow, however, it overshadows the more mundane and everyday struggles that people have with drinking.

So what’s causing this spike in alcoholism? The research on this question is inconclusive. One common theory is that stress plays a role. We know that stress can trigger addiction, and that people are more stressed today than ever before—by politics, by social media, by the news, and the list goes on and on.

Changing demographics also explain some of the shift. Alcoholism has not increased in men, but has in women as well as in the elderly population. The advancing age of the Boomer generation, and the increased problem with retirement-age addiction, is doubtless a factor.

Recovery is Possible, and Treatment Works

Regardless of why alcoholism is spiking, the fact remains that it’s a big problem. Addiction to alcohol can have a corrosive effect on physical, mental, financial, and relational health. The good news is that, no matter how bleak alcohol addiction seems, recovery is always attainable through the proper clinical intervention.

Alcoholism is a true mental health condition, but the right therapeutic approach can put it in check—and open the door to lifelong recovery. To learn more about freedom from alcohol addiction, reach out to our recovery specialists at Get Real Recovery today.

GC
GC, on in Addiction, Alcholism, Recovery, Sober Living

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